Tips & Tutorials

Get the latest streaming video tips and read in-depth tutorials on broadcasting, live streaming, VODs, asset security and video content delivery strategies.

Interlaced Video & Deinterlacing for Streaming

Interlace video example before deinterlacing

Have you ever seen video content that looks like the image above, but weren’t sure of the cause? These overt horizontal lines, appearing as pixelation around movement like out of an old school Atari game, are an artifact created from presenting an interlaced source in a progressive format.

This article explains what is interlaced video content and which sources, such as analogue cameras, can produce this type of video content on a live streaming platform. It then goes over deinterlacing techniques to remove this artifact and how to easily enable it on the encoder side… and why you wouldn’t want to use deinterlacing on content that is already progressive.


Keyframes, InterFrame & Video Compression

Keyframes, InterFrame & Video Compression

The default mental image of video compression involves unwanted video artifacts, like pixelation and blockiness in the image. This sells short, though, the complexity that actually goes into compressing video content. In particular, it overlooks a fascinating process called interframe, which involves keyframes and delta frames to intelligently compress content in a manner that is intended to go unnoticed.

This article describes this process in detail, while also giving best practices and ideal encoder settings that you can apply for use with your live streaming platform.


8 Different Types of Virtual Events

Different Types of Virtual Events

2020 was very much the year of virtual events, as previously physical venues began offering an online version of their event. Often times this would include interactivity among viewers or participants, letting them feel more involved. With people staying remote due to the pandemic, these types of events skyrocketed in adoption. As outlined in our 2021 video trends webinar, we have reason to believe that this year will also tremendous use of virtual events with high usage and evolution of the concept.

So what types of virtual events are out there? Which ones are right for you, and what might your goal or goals be? We outline 8 different use cases for your virtual events platform and possible goals to help your event be a successful one.


Dead Air – The Live Stream Killer

Back in the 1950’s and 60’s, much (if not most) early broadcast radio and television programming was produced and broadcasted live.

The skills of producing a live broadcast were refined and improved through the years. Early radio broadcasters like Alan Freed and Dick Clark, TV soap operas like As The World Turns and The Edge Of Night, most US News coverage, sporting events like the Superbowl and of course shows such as Saturday Night Live all have also used live television as a device to gain viewers by making their programs more (or atleast appear) exciting.

But the skills these producers used, whether for the 1969 Landing on the Moon, the 1996 Dallas Cowboys Superbowl victory or the live episode of ER in 1997, are no different than for a live streaming show or event.


Boost Virtual Event Registration in 6 Steps

Boost Virtual Event Registration in 6 Steps

Running virtual or hybrid events? Need some advice to help boost virtual event registration?

These six steps will help you increase your virtual event attendance. They assume you are already using a virtual event platform to run the conference, as they focus more on promotion. If you need a more in-depth guide that includes executing the event, check out this definitive guide to running virtual events.


CDN & Video: What is a Content Delivery Network?

CDN Video Delivery

Video streaming and delivery is a resource intensive process. This is attributed to the various networks a video stream must pass through as well as the quality of the video, as higher bitrates and resolutions require more information related to that stream to be sent to the end viewer. As a result of this requirement, it’s not recommended to broadcast video using your own server. For companies, this can result in bottlenecks from the servers hosting or unnecessary costs to scale a server infrastructure.

One solution to avoid both, though, is through utilizing a CDN (content delivery network). This article talks about the basics of delivering content over the Internet before why it’s important to have a CDN when streaming video content.

If you are already familiar with CDNs and would rather learn more about how IBM Watson Media offers a more robust solution for video streaming, read our live video scalability white paper.


White Label Video Platform: Live Streaming & VOD

White Label Video Platform

Looking for a white label video player solution? Broadcasters can spend hundreds if not thousands on their setups, from top of the line cameras to hardware encoders that can allow for camera switching, only to have the end product touting another company’s brand which can cheapen the viewer experience.

IBM Watson Media offers a wealth of features to help customize and allow content owners to control a viewer’s experience. This is presented as part of a white label video platform and an enterprise video platform, allowing the removal of the IBM branding and also allowing content owners to insert their own. This article covers these features in more depth. It looks at where and how content owners can remove IBM branding and insert their own and also how content access can be restricted. This includes insight into how content owners can manage elements of the video player, embedding, viewer access, and also the channel page experience.


Video Transcription: Automated Audio to Text

Video Transcription: Automated Audio to Text

Transcribing audio can be a slow process. For those looking for a solution to scale or speed up video transcription, a solution is automated audio to text. This takes AI (artificial intelligence) and uses it to transcribe speech through combining information about grammar and language structure. Using this technology, content owners can start generating transcripts through simply uploading a file.

Note: some of these topics were covered in our Simplify Your Corporate Video Strategy webinar, with the archived version available for immediate viewing.


AES Video Encryption: 256 vs 128 Bit

AES Video Encryption: 256 vs 128 Bit

Considering AES video encryption for your assets at rest and during delivery? Curious on the merits of AES-256 vs AES-128 for video?

A security audit, a systematic evaluation of the security of an organization’s information system, can measure many things to see how it conforms to established practices and criteria. In relation to video, this can include virtually every state of the content, from data at rest to in transit. This article covers what is video encryption, explains AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) and why it’s discussed about what bit key is ideal to use for video within enterprise video platforms and other use cases.


Tackling Broadcast Delays and Syncing Issues from Streaming

Tackling Broadcast Delays and Syncing Issues from Streaming

Buffering got you down? Looking for some tips to combat broadcast delays caused from streaming? Plagued by syncing issues and need some help?

Join us as we tackle some of the most common dilemmas our broadcasters face while explaining what leads to delays in a live stream.

If you are looking for more in-depth studio setups, though, please reference our Video Studio Recommendations white paper.